Linux fréttir

I got 99 secure devices but a Nintendo Switch ain't one: If you're using Nvidia's Tegra boot ROM I feel bad for you, son

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 21:17
Unpatchable vuln found, exploited to run custom code

Security researcher Kate Temkin has released proof-of-concept code dubbed Fusée Gelée that exploits a bug in Nvidia's Tegra chipsets to run custom code on locked-down devices.…

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Nintendo Switch users about to get pwned after unpatchable flaw found in Nvidia Tegra chips

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 21:17
Researcher reveals demo attack code, full release in June

Security researcher Kate Temkin has released proof-of-concept code to launch an exploit chain called Fusée Gelée, which relies on an as-yet-undisclosed vulnerability in past versions of Nvidia's Tegra system-on-a-chip.…

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AI Trained on Images from Cosmological Simulations Surprisingly Successful at Classifying Real Galaxies in Hubble Images

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 21:00
A machine learning method which has been widely used in face recognition and other image- and speech-recognition applications, has shown promise in helping astronomers analyze images of galaxies and understand how they form and evolve. From a report: In a new study, accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal and available online [PDF], researchers used computer simulations of galaxy formation to train a deep learning algorithm, which then proved surprisingly good at analyzing images of galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope. The researchers used output from the simulations to generate mock images of simulated galaxies as they would look in observations by the Hubble Space Telescope. The mock images were used to train the deep learning system to recognize three key phases of galaxy evolution previously identified in the simulations. The researchers then gave the system a large set of actual Hubble images to classify. The results showed a remarkable level of consistency in the neural network's classifications of simulated and real galaxies. "We were not expecting it to be all that successful. I'm amazed at how powerful this is," said coauthor Joel Primack, professor emeritus of physics and a member of the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) at UC Santa Cruz. "We know the simulations have limitations, so we don't want to make too strong a claim. But we don't think this is just a lucky fluke."

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Astroboffins discover the stink of eggy farts wafting from Uranus

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 20:45
Space, the rhinal frontier. These are the voyages of the Starship Trivialize...

Scientists have solved a pressing mystery about our Solar System. Does Uranus smell like farts? Yes, yes it does.…

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Astroboffins find the stink of eggy farts wafting from Uranus

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 20:45
Hold your nose, it smells exactly like what you think it does

Scientists have solved a pressing mystery about our Solar System. Does Uranus smell like farts? Yes, yes it does.…

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New Attack Group Orangeworm Targets Healthcare Sector in US, Asia, and Europe: Symantec

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 20:20
Security researchers at Symantec say a group of hackers has been targeting firms related to health care in order to steal intellectual property. The security firm observed a hacking team, called Orangeworm, compromise the systems of pharmaceutical firms, medical-device manufacturers, health-care providers, and even IT companies working with medical organizations in the US, Europe, and Asia markets. Victims don't appear to have been chosen at random but "carefully and deliberately." You can read the full report here.

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It's not just you: spammers have been slipping spoofed messages to Gmail's 'sent' folder

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 20:04
Google confirms reports of mysterious mails popping up

Google has confirmed that it is possible for spammers to create spoofed emails that appear in a user's 'sent mail' folder.…

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You've won your Fitbit case, judge tells lawyers, but those filet mignon expenses...

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 19:47
Federal judge slams brakes on class action gravy train

A federal judge has approved a $33m class action lawsuit against fitness tracker Fitbit but put the brakes on a massive $8.25m lawyer award claim.…

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Google Is Testing a New Chrome UI

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 19:40
Catalin Cimpanu, writing for BleepingComputer: Google engineers have rolled out a new Chrome user interface (UI). Work on the new Refresh UI has been underway since last year, Bleeping Computer has learned. The new UI is in early testing stages, and only available via the Google Chrome Canary distribution, a version of the Chrome browser used as a testing playground. Users who are interested in giving the new UI a spin must install Chrome Canary, and then access chrome://flags, a section that contains various experimental options not included in Chrome's default settings section.

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Was There a Civilization On Earth Before Humans?

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 19:00
Adam Frank, writing for The Atlantic: We're used to imagining extinct civilizations in terms of the sunken statues and subterranean ruins. These kinds of artifacts of previous societies are fine if you're only interested in timescales of a few thousands of years. But once you roll the clock back to tens of millions or hundreds of millions of years, things get more complicated. When it comes to direct evidence of an industrial civilization -- things like cities, factories, and roads -- the geologic record doesn't go back past what's called the Quaternary period 2.6 million years ago. For example, the oldest large-scale stretch of ancient surface lies in the Negev Desert. It's "just" 1.8 million years old -- older surfaces are mostly visible in cross section via something like a cliff face or rock cuts. Go back much farther than the Quaternary and everything has been turned over and crushed to dust. And, if we're going back this far, we're not talking about human civilizations anymore. Homo sapiens didn't make their appearance on the planet until just 300,000 years or so ago. [...] Given that all direct evidence would be long gone after many millions of years, what kinds of evidence might then still exist? The best way to answer this question is to figure out what evidence we'd leave behind if human civilization collapsed at its current stage of development. Mr. Frank, along with Gavin Schmidt, Director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, have published their research on the subject [PDF].

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Petty PETA rapped by judges over monkey selfie copyright stunt

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 18:56
Animals can sue, but don't have the ability to file intellectual property lawsuits

A US appeals court has upheld a lower court's decision that a monkey can't own copyright.…

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EU Opens Competition Probe Into Apple's Bid For Music App Shazam

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 18:30
EU antitrust regulators opened an investigation on Monday into Apple's bid for British music discovery app Shazam, concerned the deal might give the iPhone maker an unfair advantage in poaching users from its rivals. From a report: Apple announced the deal in December to help it better compete with industry leader Spotify. Shazam lets users identify songs by pointing a smartphone at the audio source. The European Commission said it was concerned about Apple's access to data on Shazam's users who use competing music streaming services in Europe.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Hacking a Satellite is Surprisingly Easy

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 17:50
Caroline Haskins, writing for The Outline: Hundreds of multi-ton liabilities -- soaring faster than the speed of sound, miles above the surface of the earth -- are operating on Windows-95. They're satellites, responsible for everything from GPS positioning, to taking weather measurements, to carrying cell signals, to providing television and internet. For the countries that own these satellites, they're invaluable resources. Even though they're old, it's more expensive to take satellites down than it is to just leave them up. So they stay up. Unfortunately, these outdated systems makes old satellites prime targets for cyber attacks. [...] A malicious actor could fake their IP address, which gives information about a user's computer and its location. This person could then get access to the satellite's computer system, and manipulate where the satellite goes or what it does. Alternatively, an actor could jam the satellite's radio transmissions with earth, essentially disabling it. The cost of such an attack could be huge. If a satellite doesn't work, life-saving GPS or online information could be withheld to people on earth when they need it most. What's worse, if part of a satellite -- or an entire satellite -- is knocked out of its orbit from an attack, the debris could create a domino effect and cause extreme damage to other satellites.

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MIT Researchers Developed a 'System For Dream Control'

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 17:00
dmoberhaus writes: Researchers at MIT Media Lab have adapted a centuries' old technique for inducing hypnagogia for the 21st century. Known as Dormio, this system is able to extend and manipulate the period users spend in a transitional state of consciousness between wakefulness and sleep known as hypnagogia. This state is characterized by vivid hallucinations and microdreams, and as the MIT researchers demonstrated, the contents of these microdreams can be manipulated with the system and subsequently result in heightened creativity when the user awakes. Motherboard got the exclusive details on the system.

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Amazon Has a Top-Secret Plan to Build Home Robots

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 16:15
After making smart speakers a household product (at least to some), Amazon seems to have found its next big consumer product: robots. Amazon is building smart robots that are equipped with cameras that let them drive around homes, Bloomberg reported Monday. These robots could launch as soon as next year. From the report: Codenamed "Vesta," after the Roman goddess of the hearth, home and family, the project is overseen by Gregg Zehr, who runs Amazon's Lab126 hardware research and development division based in Sunnyvale, California. Lab126 is responsible for Amazon devices such as the Echo speakers, Fire TV set-top-boxes, Fire tablets and the ill-fated Fire Phone. The Vesta project originated a few years ago, but this year Amazon began to aggressively ramp up hiring. There are dozens of listings on the Lab 126 Jobs page for openings like "Software Engineer, Robotics" and "Principle Sensors Engineer." People briefed on the plan say the company hopes to begin seeding the robots in employees' homes by the end of this year, and potentially with consumers as early as 2019, though the timeline could change, and Amazon hardware projects are sometimes killed during gestation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Shazam! The sound of EC shoving probe in Apple's plan to buy name-that-tune app

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 16:13
Show us your data says Euro Commish

The European Commission is causing Apple more angst by probing its acquisition of Shazam.…

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Bungling cops try to use dead chap's fingers to unlock his smartmobe

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 15:38
Open casket or open phone?

Detectives from Largo, Florida, visited a funeral home in nearby Clearwater and tried, unsuccessfully, to unlock a phone with the hand of its deceased owner to aid an investigation.…

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The Last Known Person Born in the 19th Century Dies in Japan at 117

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 15:35
Jason Kottke: As of 2015, only two women born in the 1800s and two others born in 1900 (the last year of the 19th century) were still alive. In the next two years, three of those women passed away, including Jamaican Violet Brown, the last living subject of Queen Victoria, who reigned over the British Empire starting in 1837. Last week Nabi Tajima, the last known survivor of the 19th century, died in Japan at age 117.

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The Music Industry Had a Fantastic 2017, Driven by Streaming Revenues

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-04-23 14:54
An anonymous reader shares a report: Global recorded music revenues soared by $1.4 billion in 2017 largely due to the increased adoption of music streaming services among consumers, reports the Music Industry Blog. Global recorded music revenues reached $17.4 billion in 2017, putting it just a hair below 2008's $17.7 billion in revenues. That means that most of the decline in recorded music revenues over the past 10 years has now been reversed. Streaming was the largest driver of that growth, accounting for 43% of all revenues. In 2017 streaming revenues surged by 39%, topping out at $7.4 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Brexit has shafted the UK's space sector, lord warns science minister

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-04-23 14:51
We're off the team and everything is awful

A letter to science minister Sam Gyimah MP has outlined the impact of Brexit on the UK space sector, and it doesn't make for happy reading.…

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